Guangdong TCM Zhuhai 广东中医院

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广东省中医院 珠海医院
53 Jingle Road (Jida 吉大) 景乐路53号
ZhuhaiGuangdongChina

It’s an adventure that gone a little off. On the unplanned bike tour of Macau, as I was going down the hill, in full thratle, in order to go up the hill right in front of me, I lost the control and fall on my left side. Thanks lord there’s any cars around. I got up immediately. We managed to continue to the Cheoc Van Beach (Bamboo Bay), the House of Dancing Water and the dinner. For a piece of mind, I decided, at 10 pm, to visit emergency room, to get that rubber stamp.

  • ¥23, registration – my age is never asked
  • ¥132, X Ray
  • ¥165, medicines (a box of pills and 10 pads of paste)

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Total of ¥320 (about US$46).

It’s 10 pm, there isn’t a lot of patients. After registration, we walked over to the doctor’s office. His door is open, treating a child who appears to be asleep, in his dad’s arms. Mom is standing. There are other people in the room. Two friends who go with me, go straight in, without any hesitation.

Privacy isn’t expected and respected (but secrecy!?)

When it’s my turn, (thanks lord, no one else is around except my two friends, and of course, they’ve no desire to leave the room …) the doctor asks a few questions then says, “soft rib is very difficult to diagnose and the accuracy is only 66%. …  Since 1 out of 3 is wrong, we usually treat it as broken – on the severe side, to be safe.”
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We’re off to X Ray. There are bank of machines displaying names for CT/DR self pick up. Very effective but again, privacy is being violated. Everybody knows who’s done what.

We press the bell, the metal gate goes up and a sleepy doctor or X Ray technician comes out, who leads me into the room. My friends stay by the door. I know they mean well and are looking after me.

 

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“Change” he points to the two pieces greenish garment that are hinging on the wall. They look soiled.
“Do I have to?”
“Yes.”
“I’ll take off my bra and keep my tank top.”
“Change. It’s for your own good.” He keeps an even, a little tired voice.
I change. All the while, thinking unknown worms are swimming …

The X Ray sends to the doctor’s monitor in no time. He looks at it, and gives me a clean bill but adds, “as I said before, 1 out 3 times, we misdiagnose. Take another one in a week if you still feel pain.”

One of my friends adds, “you now can go to your New York doctor … ” I sincerely hoped that the friend won’t make such comment. Because as I predict, the TCM doctor says, through his nose, “American doctors know nothing. They don’t treat enough patients.”

Medical insurance in China, according my friend, is relatively inexpensive compare to what we’re paying in the USA. They fork over ¥200 a month via salary deduction and the employer pays the other half. For each medical visit, (mostly hospitals), they pay 20% of the total charge.

If a patient fancies an expert, they need to pay more. How the doctors become experts? They take exam.

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