Aug 23 2016

Fat margin and noisy @ BCD Tofu House  

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BCD Tofu House
220-05 Northern Blvd,
Bayside, NY 11361
(718) 224-8889

Won’t return: loud music and even louder clinking of utensils (metal) and dishes. Why do they have to throw them, instead put them down gently? And apparently the owner or manager don’t consider it rude and annoying. It’s totally beyond me. Yelp

Oh the kimchi. Too sweet and as if hasn’t been fully fermented. The tofu pot is one dimension: there isn’t any depth to it other than spicy.

I’ve tried Barefoot which cost $4.99 a couple of years ago. They’re decent, just as two buck chuck @ Trader Joe’s; and they sell it $6.99 a glass (most restaurants don’t put the name of their house wine down). This isn’t a criticism of any sort but a marvel at the fat margin they’ve.

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This location used to be another Korean restaurant or the same I couldn’t remember. The bright spot is the fried fish – the side dish.


Aug 17 2016

Picnic by the Lake

The 778 acres park has so much to offer and is immensely enjoyable.

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the Lake

Bethesda Fountain with lotus. I spot two fake monks begging for money, one of them asked me why am I taking video, in Mandarin.

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The wedding, the horse carriages, the dumplings, the love boat …

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The dogs

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After the park we head over to the Met.


Aug 17 2016

The wine vessel at the Met

After the Park, we went to the Met. The huge wine vessel, a gift from JP Morgan. The bugs on the bottles are so vivid.

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From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th Centuries is on display. So is Manus x Machina Fashion in an Age of Technology, and the Roof Garden‘s Cornelia Parker‘s barn PsychoBarn.

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This Screen with birthday celebration for General Guo Ziyi is from late Qing period, by Lu Guisheng (active 1821-50); carved red and black lacquer. The inscription in the upper right indicates that the screen was made in honor of a certain General Zhen, most likely upon an important birthday, such as his sixtieth. More here

 

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Fine details, although they look rough. L: Torso of a Bodhisattva of transcendent wisdom; R: Head of Manjushri, the Bodhisattva. Both are from Java Indoesia, abt 9th century.

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This seems to be one piece: to the right side is calligraphy and the pavilion of Prince Teng during Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), but to the left, is 题跋 /preface by Zhang Daqian (1899-1983) in 1940, ??? The little sampan to the left is beautiful.

The Chinese courtyard

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Aug 17 2016

Mostly Mozart

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At Lincoln Center. With Joshua Bell playing Mozart violin concert No 4 and after the intermission, Beethoven’s 8th, which I went for. There’s a pre concert @ 6pm.  However, we preferred the wine bar instead after the Met and the Park.

People sit on Lincoln Ristorante, enjoying the gorgeous day.

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We haven’t been there for a few years and now they put concert going on stage – it’s great that they’re selling out. It’s a wonderful program:

  • Mendelssohn overture to a midsummer night’s dream
  • Mozart violin concert No 4
  • Beethoven voture to Coriolan
  • Beethoven symphony No 8

An old lady put her plastic bag on her lap which made annoying noise as she fidgeted. I asked her to put it on the floor, she didn’t understand my Chinglish. When I complaint to the usher, she said: “I’ll have to witness it.”
“Please be my guest.” I said.
“But I can’t be inside.” She replied.
Oh man. What did that leave me?
She then told me to talk to the manager, who was an orchestra usher turn manager. We’ve a little chat before the second half began.
The sky is so blue, that, made up for everything…

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Lincoln Center movie is showing Equity about Wall Street (women, especially … don’t let money be a dirty word …) which, is, a surprise to me. I’ve the trailer being played at the regular movie theater recently: so wondering why does it end up at Lincoln?


Aug 17 2016

Vanguard Wine Bar

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189 Amsterdam Ave., New York
(212) 799-9463

This Upper West Side wine bar is one of my favorites. Cozy benches and cushions but bit over priced. It’s humming on a week day. We got there after Mets, getting crowded from 6pm and on. It’s convenient to Lincoln Center and the food is fine:

  1. Mini caviar trio: smoked trout roe, wasabi tobiko on blini creme fraiche and chives
  2. Combo meats n cheeses
  3. Arugula walnut and grape salad

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We’ve three red: I love the Syrah, very yummy:

  1. Chateau la Bastide “Vieilles Vignes’ 2013 Syrah
  2. Domaine de la Damase 2014 Grenache
  3. “Original Malbec” Anne de Joyeuse 2014

Yelp


Aug 17 2016

The Roof Garden & Balcony Lounge

The Met has a few eateries, from public cafe to private dining room. The the Roof Garden has great views and different exhibit from time to time – currently is Cornelia Parker‘s barn PsychoBarn.

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We’ve tea at Balcony Lounge, which is a very restful, and far better a choice than the rooftop Garden. It’s at the 2nd floor, adjacent to the Great Hall Balcony. The Leipziger Bier, Gose from Germany is very refreshing: lemony.

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Aug 17 2016

Peking Opera costumes at the Met

The Met is showing From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th Centuries @ The Met Fifth Avenue, Gallery 220, Florence and Herbert Irving Galleries for Chinese Decorative Arts.

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Fm the Met: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s next textile presentation in its Florence and Herbert Irving Galleries for Chinese Decorative Arts will shed light on Chinese opera costumes. Drawn entirely from The Met collection, From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th Centuries will examine these luxury textiles from artistic and technical points of view. The exhibition will be organized in two rotations. The first will focus on costumes used in dramas based on historical events; and the second will feature costumes from plays derived from legends and myths. The presentation will showcase eight robes, each of which was created for a specific role—court lady, official, general, monk, nun, and immortal. A set of album leaves faithfully depicting theatrical characters wearing such robes will also be displayed.

The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.

The 18th and 19th centuries witnessed a flowering of Chinese drama. Under the patronage of the Qing court (1644–1911), performances—including the “Peking Opera”—filled the Forbidden City in Beijing. A form of traditional Chinese theater, Peking Opera was developed fully by the mid-19th century, and because of the form’s minimal stage settings and the importance of exaggerated gestures and movements, costume played an unusually significant role.

The exhibition will include superb examples with interior markings indicating their use in court productions.

The exhibition is curated by Pengliang Lu, Henry A. Kissinger Curatorial Fellow, and Denise Patry Leidy, Brooke Russell Astor Curator of Chinese Art, both in the Museum’s Department of Asian Art.


Aug 8 2016

Catch Roof

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21 Ninth Avenue
New York, NY 10014
(212) 392-5978

This Meatpacking District in West Village is pretty good. Food I’d give it 4.5, decor 3 and service 3.5. Bathroom is clean, bit too dark tho. The waiting staff could wash their uniform more often.

I’m most impressed by their mussels: not a single sand. The last time I had clean mussels was at an Italian restaurant on Bleecker Street in 1990s. The Branzino is very yummy, the Crispy Shrimp is bit too sweet but the texture is super.

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Yelp


Aug 8 2016

Monks at the Hing Line Park

As soon as I walk up to the park from Gansevoort Street, I see this new addition at the park: warning not to give money to fake monks.

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Aug 6 2016

Grain House, II

This is the second time, also the last time. The picture below, next to the menu is tea, not coffee. Yelp

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We arrived at 11:30 for lunch to an empty restaurant. There is a woman with two children, about 6 years old, by the bar who didn’t bother to acknowledge us. A cartoon is on the tv the entire time. The kids roam around the restaurant, from time to time as they wish. I understand the working parents dilemma but this isn’t the place to keep your children, especially when you want to establish yourself as a serious business.

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  • Beef tribe is good
  • Lamb wrapped in tinfoil is good
  • Dandan noddle is ok
  • Juicy soup buns/dumplings – Xiaorong Bao is terrible, from supermarket frozen section?
  • Eggplant is too sweet
  • Beef Lo Mein is ok
  • Rice, for Pete’s sake is old and hard

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The dumplings cost $6.25 when Nanxiang charges $5.25 with supiror quality, no comparison.